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On 23 June, Badger embarked on the seven-week round of exercises punctuated with visits to west coast ports that constituted EASTPAC 86. Over the next six months, Badger went through the usual trials and certifications as well as all types of exercises and drills. The warship underwent a restricted availability at the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard lasting until late October and resumed normal operations in the Hawaiian Operating Area in November. Wreck of USS Badger (FF-1071) The Badger was the 20th member of the Knox Class of Frigates and served from 1970 to 1991 based out of Pearl Harbor. Further trials, inspections, and readiness ensued. It was his life. During that tour of duty, she also kept an eye on two Chinese merchantmen in the area. Badger was redesignated "frigate" FF-1071 on 1 … She also made port calls at Singapore, Port Louis in Mauritius, Mombasa in Kenya, Karachi in Pakistan, and Colombo in Sri Lanka. The former warship performed her last service for the Navy on 22 July 1998 at which time she was sunk as a target during the United States Third Fleet exercise RIMPAC 98 at .mw-parser-output .geo-default,.mw-parser-output .geo-dms,.mw-parser-output .geo-dec{display:inline}.mw-parser-output .geo-nondefault,.mw-parser-output .geo-multi-punct{display:none}.mw-parser-output .longitude,.mw-parser-output .latitude{white-space:nowrap}22°51′06″N 160°33′00″W / 22.85167°N 160.55000°W / 22.85167; -160.55000 ("USS Badger (FF-1071)"). At that time, Badger stood out of Pearl Harbor for a six-week goodwill cruise to the South Pacific. Upkeep there, including a period in drydock, lasted until 29 September. Upkeep there, including a period in drydock, lasted until 29 September. On 11 March, group retransited the Strait of Malacca and left the Indian Ocean behind. Although refloated on 2 March 1987, she did not resume active service for almost two more months. Four days later, however, she was reassigned to plane guard duty, this time for the ASW support carrier USS Ticonderoga (CV-14) . She returned to Hawaii at the end of August and then, except for 17 days in drydock between 28 September and 15 October, spent September and October engaged in normal operations in Hawaiian waters. Along the way, Badger stopped at Pearl Harbor, Midway, and Guam before arriving in Subic Bay on 7 April. Badger departed Subic Bay on 1 July 1979 in company with Brewton, Rathburne, and USNS Mispillion. She returned to Hawaii from that mission on 24 January and settled into more than two months of local operations out of Pearl Harbor. Badger put to sea on 17 April to rendezvous with sistership USS Harold E. Holt (FF-1074) and guided missile destroyer escort USS Schofield (FFG-3), and Kiska for the voyage to the western Pacific. On 22 June, Badger stood out of Pearl Harbor on her way to the Far East as part of a task group built around Carl Vinson. On 11 September, Badger put to sea to participate in the four-nation Exercise RIMPAC '73. USS Badger (FF-1071) was a Knox-class destroyer escort, originally designated as DE-1071 and reclassified as a frigate in 1975 in the United States Navy.Her primary mission of ASW remained unchanged. Training in the Hawaiian operating area occupied her until early September. After completing a COMPTUEX, a READIEX, and a naval gunfire support requalification, Badger returned to Hawaii on 21 March and began a month of preparations for overseas movement. The warships reentered Subic Bay on 23 March, and Badger began a 12-day upkeep. Following post-deployment standdown, the frigate resumed local operations out of Pearl late in December. Keel Laid February 17 1968 - Launched December 7 1968. She reached Subic Bay on the 27th but remained only three days, putting to sea again on the 30th bound for Singapore. Four days later, the destroyer escort arrived at Guam whence she conducted special operations. The task group stopped at Singapore for a four-day port visit before transiting the Strait of Malacca on 8 July and entering the Indian Ocean, where intensive exercises and drills in all facets of ship's operations highlighted periods at sea punctuated by visits to Colombo, Sri Lanka, and Mombasa. Badger completed the repairs on 24 September, carried out the usual trials and examinations in October, and resumed normal training missions out of Pearl Harbor early in November. Throughout that deployment, she conducted exercises with units of Allied navies as well as with 7th Fleet units. Every sailor loved his ship. In mid-October, the frigate visited Chinhae, Korea, for five days and then carried out four days of training with units of the South Korean Navy. Next came a call each at Pusan in late October and at Hong Kong early in November. Badger spent the next nine months engaged in exercises and drills conducted out of Pearl Harbor. During the month of May, the warship combined the customary post-deployment standdown period with preparations for the periodic visit by the inspection and survey team. During the last week in October, Badger took part in the first phase of a major fleet exercise with a pair of carrier task groups built around USS Constellation (CV-64) and USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70). She began gunfire support missions on the 11th and, on the 13th, received her first counterbattery fire. After spending 20 days supporting the carrier, Badger returned to gunfire support missions on 26 June. Although refloated on 2 March 1987, she did not resume active service for almost two more months. Back at sea on 27 May, the warship conducted further ASW work in the South China Sea until the end of the month. At the conclusion of that exercise on 7 September, the ships made a four-day visit to Pattaya Beach, Thailand, before shaping a course for the Philippines. She returned to sea in mid-October for engineering drills and again early in November for more of the same and to complete a propulsion plant certification examination. She immediately began a repair and upkeep period that lasted until 20 January 1974, when she headed for Guam. From 22 to 27 April, she operated in the South China Sea shadowing two Soviet submarines. Later, USS Reclaimer relieved Waxahachie and pulled the stricken destroyer escort into Pearl Harbor on the morning of the 12th. She spent two days escorting Hancock in the local operating area before returning to port on 22 May. Badger completed fitting out at the Long Beach Naval Shipyard in January 1971 and then spent most of the spring engaged in tests and shakedown training. She arrived in Danang, South Vietnam, two days later and, after a four-hour layover, again got underway, bound for the northern gunline near the mouth of the Cua Viet River. Badger finally took up a more active schedule late in May with helicopter landing qualifications on the 20th and 21st and evolutions at sea during the last days of the month in connection with her material readiness inspection. This web site is dedicated to all of the Officers, Chiefs and Crew who served aboard USS JOSEPH HEWES DE/FF/FFT-1078 so well during her 23 years of United States Naval Service. She returned to sea on the 16th and soon arrived back on the gunline. The last 7th Fleet assignment of her Navy career came to an end on 22 November when she embarked on that final western Pacific passage. After a week of upkeep, she put to sea for Guam. She then visited Pusan, South Korea, on 28 and 29 September, before returning to sea for two weeks of surveillance operations in the Sea of Japan. Badger was a steam-powered ship built before U.S. Navy regulations all but banned the use of asbestos in ship construction. She arrived in Subic Bay on 24 August for repairs before putting to sea on the 30th, bound for Vietnamese waters. This work occupied her for the remainder of 1976 and through the first few days of 1977. The warships arrived in Yokosuka exactly three weeks later after an exercise-filled passage. After pausing at Guam for fuel on 29 March, the warships pulled into Subic Bay on 4 April and spent the rest of the month alternating exercises in the local operating area with periods of upkeep in port. The exercise concluded on 21 March, and Badger returned to Pearl Harbor to prepare for overseas movement. The exercise-filled, 17-day passage to the Philippines ended on the 19th at Subic Bay where Badger began five days of repairs and meetings before heading to duty in the Indian Ocean and the Arabian Sea on 24 August. Badger completed her part in the exercises early in December and, after a visit to Yokosuka, Japan, set out on the voyage back to Hawaii on the 13th in company with Joseph Strauss. Once back in Pearl, the frigate did not get underway again except to shift berths. After 12 days at sea, the frigate reentered her home port on 28 April. During the voyage, she called at Pago Pago and Apia in the Samoan Islands, Nukualofa and Vavau in the Tonga Islands, and Funafuti in the Tuvalu Islands before returning to Hawaii by way of Apia. On 16 March 1972, she weighed anchor and stood out of Long Beach on her way to the Far East. When the guided missile frigate USS Gridley relieved Long Beach, Badger continued on station until 10 September, when she was relieved of middle SAR station escort duties by her sister ship USS Hepburn and proceeded to rendezvous with the carrier USS Hancock. USS Badger (FF-1071) turns away after refueling from USS Sacramento (AOE-1) in the Pacific Ocean on 16 March 1978.jpg 1,897 × 1,496; 950 KB USS Badger (FF-1071) underway in the Pacific Ocean on 1 December 1985 (6418976).jpeg 1,935 × 1,449; 2.36 MB Feb 8, 2015 - USS Badger (FF-1071). Following upkeep, Badger headed back to the combat zone on 17 July 1972. Four days later, the destroyer escort arrived at Guam whence she conducted special operations. She did not put to sea again until late May when she began refresher training, inspections, examinations, and certifications. The frigate stood out of Pearl Harbor with USS Elliot (DD-967) and USS Brooke (FFG-1) on 24 April. She returned to Subic on the 27th and remained there until 5 May when the destroyer escort began the voyage back home to Hawaii. When she reentered Pearl Harbor on 14 November, Badger started preparing for a three-month drydocking that began on 8 December. At the conclusion of that exercise on 7 September, the ships made a four-day visit to Pattaya Beach, Thailand, before shaping a course for the Philippines. The following day, the ships moored in Subic Bay. On 26 September, Badger departed Pearl Harbor in company with the Ranger task group bound for an extended assignment with the 7th Fleet. On the 19th, Badger was switched to plane guard duty for the aircraft carrier USS Constellation in the Gulf of Tonkin. During that availability, she received extensive modifications including the addition of a basic point defense missile system (BPDMS) and of an independent variable depth sonar system. Edit. 50 First Dates (2004) Trivia (33) ... (DE 1071) named after Admiral Oscar C. Badger II, Charles J. Badger's son (1890-1958), who was the first Navy officer to step ashore in Japan at the end of World War II and was also awarded the Naval Medal of Honor. The USS BADGER (FF-1071), a Knox class frigate, was commissioned on 1 DEC 1970 as DE-1071. From 22 to 27 April, she operated in the South China Sea shadowing two Soviet submarines. Badger earned one battle star during the Vietnam War. They stopped for fuel at Guam and Midway before arriving back in Pearl Harbor on 4 October. Three ships of the United States Navy have been named Badger: USS Badger (1889), an auxiliary cruiser purchased in 1898 and used in the Spanish-American War, USS Badger (DD-126), a Wickes-class destroyer commissioned in 1919 and active during World War II, USS Badger (FF-1071), a Knox-class destroyer escort commissioned in 1970, reclassified as a frigate in 1975 and decommissioned in 1991 … USS BADGER DE-1071. On 17 November, she rejoined the Kitty Hawk task group again south of Sri Lanka on its way back to Subic Bay. She concluded that assignment on 2 September and shaped a course for Sasebo, but received orders the following day to proceed north in the wake of the tragic downing, by a Soviet fighter, of Korean Air Lines Flight 007 over Sakhalin Island on 1 September. Badger reached the patrol area in the northern Arabian Sea on 10 September and began four weeks of duty on that station. On 26 September, Badger departed Pearl Harbor in company with the Ranger task group bound for an extended assignment with the 7th Fleet. Underway again on short notice, leaving behind some 52 men who had been on leave and liberty at the time of her sailing, she carried out surprise ASW operations west of Subic Bay between the 18th and the 20th, retrieving four of her men via the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea on the latter date, and then headed for a liberty call at Hong Kong, where the remainder of the men left behind at her hurried departure joined her via the command ship USS Blue Ridge. Her primary mission of ASW remained unchanged. Badger ended her part in the KAL 007 SAR effort on the 20th and reached Yokosuka on the 21st to prepare for the voyage back to Hawaii. For the remainder of 1986, the warship went to sea only rarely. The ship's crew then enjoyed a 16-day liberty call before the ship began her second deployment on the 17th. After five days of repairs and upkeep, the frigate set sail for the Philippines on 22 July. Underway again on short notice, leaving behind some 52 men who had been on leave and liberty at the time of her sailing, she carried out surprise ASW operations west of Subic Bay between the 18th and the 20th, retrieving four of her men via the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on the latter date, and then headed for a liberty call at Hong Kong, where the remainder of the men left behind at her hurried departure joined her via the command ship USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19). Badger returned to Subic Bay on 11 November and made preparations for the voyage back to Hawaii. The Fourth Registration, often referred to as the "old man's registration", was conducted on 27 April 1942. The latter began on 8 January 1973 and included the conversion of her main propulsion system to Navy distillate fuel and the installation of a light airborne multipurpose system (LAMPS). On 9 August, she was assigned duty interdicting communist waterborne logistics and remained so engaged until 12 August when she relieved guided missile frigate USS Worden as plane guard for Midway, once again headed for Subic Bay. She was back at sea the following afternoon; rejoined the exercise; and, following its conclusion, returned to Pearl on 21 September. Throughout that deployment, she conducted exercises with units of Allied navies as well as with 7th Fleet units. Concluding a four-week absence, Badger returned to Oahu on 14 June and began preparations to deploy overseas. During the remainder of August and the first part of September, Badger called at a succession of Japanese ports. The relative inactivity of holiday leave and upkeep commenced in mid-December and continued for about a month. She returned to Hawaii at the end of August and then, except for 17 days in drydock between 28 September and 15 October, spent September and October engaged in normal operations in Hawaiian waters. The warship returned to Pearl Harbor on 6 December 1988 and her post-deployment standdown lasted until 17 January 1989. She took part in an amphibious exercise along the way near Okinawa before arriving in Yokosuka on 16 June. She visited San Diego, California, Portland, Oregon, and Homer, Alaska before returning to Oahu on 16 July. The repair work continued through March and during the first two weeks of April; and, although she returned to sea on two occasions during the second part of April, it was only for brief sea trials. She reached Subic Bay on the 27th but remained only three days, putting to sea again on the 30th bound for Singapore. Report This. Badger and the task group remained in the Indian Ocean through the end of the year and into 1981 conducting intensive training of all types including multilateral exercises with Allied navies. Following an inspection and survey to gauge her fitness for further service, she began a two-month restricted availability. She then resumed local operations in the Hawaiian Islands on a schedule that kept her moderately busy through the end of May. Her visit to Singapore, however, proved a brief one, shortened by orders on 6 August to rescue Vietnamese refugees in the vicinity of the Spratly Islands. From that port, she participated in MIDLINK '73 until its conclusion on 2 December. Badger remained in the Mariana Islands until 13 February when she departed Guam to return to Subic Bay. The warship disembarked the refugees at Subic Bay on the 10th and, after several days of upkeep, set out for Japan again. After pausing at Guam for fuel on 29 March, the warships pulled into Subic Bay on 4 April and spent the rest of the month alternating exercises in the local operating area with periods of upkeep in port. After a passage that included a variety of drills and exercises and a five-day layover at Guam for a short availability, Badger reached Manila on 16 May 1983. Badger continued to carry out training missions in the Hawaiian operating area well into 1988. In June, the frigate resumed a normal schedule of local training operations and continued so engaged for the rest of 1987. The table below contains the names of sailors who served aboard the USS Badger (FF 1071). She parted company with the unit on 4 July and headed for Japan, arriving in Yokosuka on the 16th. During the full power run, the ship suffered a casualty to her low pressure turbine and was taken in tow by the large harbor tug Waxahachie. In mid-October, the frigate visited Chinhae, Korea, for five days and then carried out four days of training with units of the South Korean Navy. That training complete, the task group returned to Pearl Harbor on 23 September for a final liberty call before heading for the Far East. The warship made the voyage in six days, entering Pearl on 14 July. She then resumed local operations in the Hawaiian Islands on a schedule that kept her moderately busy through the end of May. The following day, the ships moored in Subic Bay. USS Day (DE-225) Rudderow Class DE: USS Dayton (CL-105) Cleveland Class WWII Light Cruiser: USS De Haven (DD-469) Conf. The two warships reentered Pearl Harbor on 22 December, and Badger spent the rest of 1984 in port. Upon her return to the combat zone, the warship took up position as escort for the guided missile cruiser USS Long Beach on the middle SAR station. During the voyage, she called at Pago Pago and Apia in the Samoan Islands, Nukualofa and Vavau in the Tonga Islands, and Funafuti in the Tuvalu Islands before returning to Hawaii by way of Apia. She spent eight days in repairs at Yokosuka and then set a course back to the South China Sea where she carried out surveillance missions until the latter part of July. On the last day of the month, she put to sea as a unit of TG 75.1 to begin a 60-day training cruise to the Indian Ocean. The frigate stood out of Pearl Harbor with USS Elliot and USS Brooke on 24 April. On the 9th, she moored in the harbor at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, for an eight-day stay before returning to Subic on the 18th. On 7 July, the warship resumed plane guard duties, this time for the carrier USS Midway, and departed Vietnamese waters in company with that carrier. During the first half of May, she joined Brewton and Rathburne in a round-trip voyage to Hong Kong for a goodwill and liberty call. Badger conducted an upkeep and liberty period at that port from 17 to 23 August and got underway on the latter day to return to the Philippines. In mid-August, she began pre-deployment training with a carrier task group formed around USS Ranger. Late in May and early in June, Badger operated with a task group in the South China Sea before returning to Subic Bay on the 11th. Just under a month later on 16 April, the Ranger task group put to sea to return to Hawaii. During that assignment, the ocean escort joined five other American ships in providing gunfire support for operations carried out in Military Region II by the South Vietnamese Army's 22d Division. From then on, the frigate busied herself with the never-ending cycle of readiness exercises and drills punctuated by the usual material inspections and proficiency examinations. They stopped for fuel at Guam and Midway before arriving back in Pearl Harbor on 4 October. The two warships reentered Pearl Harbor on 22 December, and Badger spent the rest of 1984 in port. Though she made most of the crossing with the task group, Badger did not remain a part of it throughout the deployment.

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